Books We Love

There are so many Christian books out there. Lots of them are great, many more are garbage. Figuring out where to start and what is worth your precious time can be a daunting task. This is a list of our favourite books on various topics to help make sure you are reading Christ exalting, soul edifying books.


Of making many books there is no end... Ecclesiastes 12:12

Classics


The Institutes of the Christian Religion: John Calvin


The Institutes are, I think, the greatest, deepest, and most extensive treatment of the grace of God I have ever read.  Tim Keller


Pilgrim's Progress: John Bunyan


Next to the Bible, the book that I value most is John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. I believe I have read it through at least a hundred times! It is a volume of which I never seem to tire; and the secret of its freshness is that it is so largely compiled from the Scriptures. It is really Biblical teaching put into the form of a simple yet very striking allegory. C.H Spurgeon


The Bruised Reed: Richard Sibbes


The Bruised Reed, quietened, soothed, comforted, encouraged and healed me. Martyn Lloyd-Jones


Confessions: Augustine of Hippo


Augustine offers his Confessions as a grand narrativisation of the journey toward, true wisdom: knowledge of God and knowledge of oneself. John Calvin


Precious Remedies Against Satan's Devices: Thomas Brooks


My soul can feed upon such blessed food as that and be satisfied with it. C.H. Spurgeon


Christian In Complete Armour: William Gurnall


If I might read only one book beside the Bible, I would choose The Christian in Complete Armour. John Newton


Valley of Vision: Ed. Arthur Bennett


When used slowly, for meditation and prayer, these pages have often been used by God’s Spirit to kindle my dry heart. Mark Dever


Holiness: J.C. Ryle


A book I think every Christian should read. It is so readable, so accessible, a very simple style of presentation, but absolutely forceful, and discerning. Every time I read it the Lord uses it to press upon me the importance and the possibility of holiness. Kevin DeYoung